A nice career development guide

Posted: August 26, 2013 in Anouncements
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Some days ago Teresa Crane come to me with a guide to review and share with my reader’s if i think this can be useful for the ones who read our column.

After some analysis i had found in this guide some of the steps i had done in my career, i think sharing this information can be useful for the ones who are giving their first steps in the market, also i think that for technical people.

You can read the full guide in http://www.bestcollegesonline.com/career-skills-learn-school/.

But i will copy down some of the most relevant statements i had found in this guide.

IDENTIFY POTENTIAL EMPLOYERS

Create a list of specific companies and organizations that are currently seeking people with your job skills. You may already be working in your field and have an awareness of where hiring is taking place. If so, add these businesses to your list and continue to explore similar companies and those that provide related services. If you are planning to enter a new field after graduation, now is the time to find out more about the industry you are interested in and identify potential employers to add to your list.

Keep your list of potential employers up-to-date, adding and removing information to maintain a current roster of contacts. Find a format that works for you and is easy to edit. […]

 

ESTABLISH YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE

What will potential employers find out if they search for information about you online? A positive and professional online presence is gaining importance in today’s job market. Having an online presence allows you to not only participate in social networking activities related to your career field, but also present your experience, interests, and skills to potential employers in an arena where they are already active – the Internet. […]

NETWORKING SKILLS

Active professional networking means reaching out to and maintaining contact with those individuals who can provide you with information about your career field and potential opportunities. These efforts may open up leads to positions you weren’t aware of, jobs that are filled through referrals, and opportunities that are so new they haven’t been advertised. TheRiley Guide cites a recent report that found over a quarter of external hires where placed as a result of referrals.

Networking can take place in a variety of ways and result in both helpful information and assistance.

  • Contact your previous employers, internship supervisors, and other individuals who may be aware of your skills and experience. Let them know that you are in school, or a recent graduate, and what type of employment you are seeking.
  • Join and participate in relevant professional groups, both formal and informal, that are made up of people working in your field, and that involve discussions about trends and employment. Keep in mind that joining is just the first step in networking with groups — you’ve also got to take the initiative and actively participate in the events and conversations.
  • Ask for help. Let your network know you are looking for a job and what you are looking for in the way of information and assistance. Be as specific as possible with your requests. Ask for an introduction to a valuable contact, for example.
  • Thank those who are helpful to you. Express your appreciation for their efforts and consider how you might offer similar assistance to others in the future.

RESUMES

There is a wealth of advice on how to write resumes and cover letters available online, at your career center, and through private resume writing services. The function of the resume is to attract an employer’s attention to your qualifications, show how you fit their needs, and hopefully prompt them to invite you an interview so they can find out more about you. […]

PERSISTENCE SKILLS

There’s no doubt that today’s job market is challenging. What if a job offer doesn’t come right away? According to the Career Services Center at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, you can expect your job search to take anywhere from 8 to 23 weeks. It could even take longer depending on your needs and the economic conditions surrounding your field during the time of your search. What can you do to survive a long search? […]

 

 

 

 

 

To end in the name of all the digital mind ignition crew and reader’s a big thanks to Teresa for sharing this guide with us.

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